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Arts & Crafts Hoarding Guide in Tokyo

Konnichiwa Kawaii Artsy Travelers! :)

Some people have been asking us where to shop art & craft materials in Tokyo, so here is the much-awaited post!

While going around Tokyo with my creative friend Abbey, we visited a lot of “yabai” (dangerous lol) stores that offered a lot of #OnlyInJapan art materials! Abbey’s reaction every time we would go to a store / “art mall” (store is an understatement lololols) = priceless! Just a precaution before you decide to add these places to your itinerary… make sure you have extra funds because you might be hoarding more than the usual, haha. When I first went to these places, I was sooo dumbstruck. I didn’t know where to start, haha! :))


YUZAWAYA: Art materials, kawaii fabrics, craft kits and more!

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The Yuzawaya branch that we visited is Yuzawa Parco Urawa branch. This is the only branch I would visit because it’s convenient (I’m from Saitama! :D). Yuzawaya offers a wide range of art materials and fashion-related materials (from pens, craft kits, resin materials, fabric textiles, etc.). I think that it is safe to say that this is like a mini “Nippori” too (extra trivia: Nippori is dubbed as the Fabric Town in Tokyo).

I haven’t been to the Shinjuku branch but here are the access details based on their website.

YUZAWAYA Shinjuku Branch: Takashimaya Times Square 11F

TEL.03-5367-4141 (representative)
FAX.03-5369-8686
Business hours: 10 AM  – 8PM

Click here for the available list of branches (in Japanese).

 

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Asakusa + Tokyo Sky Tree in One Day

If you don’t know what to do for the whole day in Tokyo, I highly recommend a whole day trip in Asakusa and Tokyo Sky Tree.

You can do a lot of sightseeing at Asakusa and you can visit the famous temples and shrines. If you are a Japanese culture fan, you will love this place. Special icecream flavors, lots of Japanese souvenirs, yummy street food are just a few of my favorites here! ^^

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You can check more photos using this tag from my blog~ ^^

That pretty girl at the right is our friend, Carly!

Asakusa (浅草) is the center of Tokyo‘s shitamachi (literally “low city”), one of Tokyo’s districts, where an atmosphere of the Tokyo of past decades survives.

Asakusa’s main attraction is Sensoji, a very popular Buddhist temple, built in the 7th century. The temple is approached via the Nakamise, a shopping street that has been providing temple visitors with a variety of traditional, local snacks and tourist souvenirs for centuries.

Asakusa can easily be explored on foot. Alternatively, you can consider a guided tour on a rickshaw (jinrikisha, literally “man powered vehicle”). A 30 minute tour for two persons costs around 8000yen. Shorter and longer courses are also available.

 [Access Guide]

Asakusa is served by the Ginza Subway Line, Asakusa Subway Line, Tsukuba Express and Tobu Railways. It can also be accessed by the Tokyo Water Bus.

From Tokyo Station

Take the JR Yamanote Line to Kanda Station (2 minutes, 140 yen) and transfer to the Ginza Subway Line for Asakusa (10 minutes, 170 yen).

From Shinjuku Station

Take the orange JR Chuo Line to Kanda Station (10 minutes, 170 yen) and transfer to the Ginza Subway Line for Asakusa (10 minutes, 170 yen).

Source: www.japan-guide.com

 

After spending the morning around Asakusa area, you can visit the Tokyo Sky Tree which is just nearby. Take the train TOBU SKYTREE LINE from Tokyo Skytree Station. Click here for the access guide / train map~

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How To Travel Between Tokyo and Osaka

Konnichiwa kawaii travellers! This is Ashley and now I’m in Osaka staying with my family. Perfect timing for those who were asking about “how to travel between Tokyo and Osaka”. I’m not a picky traveler at all, I’ve tried different kinds of transportation while going around Japan -local trains, express trains, bullet trains, buses, night buses, ferries, airplanes, etc. In this post, you’ll not only know how to travel between Tokyo and Osaka but you’ll learn how to get from point A to point B in Japan.

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(But first, here’s a photo of me in a local train station in Hyogo prefecture)

Question: “I’m on a tight budget. What’s the cheapest way to get from Tokyo to Osaka?

There are actually a hundred ways to do this! I’m going to tell you how I did it..

1. Day Bus – I usually use WILLER EXPRESS to reserve tickets because they offer English language in their website which is very convenient for kawaii travellers like us. Most of the time I travel from Shinjuku to Umeda. Or Kawasaki to Umeda. Just pick the cheapest result. Umeda by the way, is Central Osaka. It’s in Osaka, I repeat. Haha! The day bus I’ve tried from Kawasaki was scheduled to leave from 9:30am with the arrival time of 5:00pm in Umeda, if I remember correctly. You’ll receive a trip reminder from WILLER EXPRESS an hour before your trip. Be careful and  be on time! Sometimes, WILLER EXPRESS bus stops are not close to the main station.

  Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 12.28.05 PM 2. Night Bus. Enter your point of origin and destination, departure date, number of passengers (for female, they have designated places for you in case you don’t want to be seated next to a guy) and click search.

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